Signs and Symptoms of Hypothermia and Frostbite

wind chill chartIt is COLD out there! If you need to be out and about in this weather, please dress appropriately and avoid prolonged exposure to the cold. Not dressing appropriately and staying outside too long in these cold temperatures could lead to serious cold related illness and injury such as Hypothermia or Frostbite.

Please take a moment to learn the Signs and Symptoms of Hypothermia and Frostbite from our friends at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Also learn what to do if you, or another person, are exhibiting signs or symptoms of either condition.

Hypothermia

A condition in which the body uses up its stored energy and can no longer produce heat. Often occurs after prolonged exposure to cold temperature.

Early symptoms

  • Shivering
  • Fatigue
  • Loss of coordination
  • Confusion and disorientation

Late symptoms

  • No shivering
  • Blue skin
  • Dilated pupils
  • Slowed pulse and breathing
  • Loss of consciousness

First Aid

  • Request immediate medical assistance.
  • Move the victim into a warm room or shelter.
  • Remove wet clothing.
  • Warm the center of their body first—chest, neck, head, and groin—using an electric blanket; or use skin-to-skin contact under loose, dry layers of blankets, clothing, or towels.
  • If conscious, warm beverages may help increase the body temperature. Do not give alcohol.
  • Once temperature has increased keep them dry and wrapped in a warm blanket, including the head and neck.
  • If no pulse, begin CPR.

Frostbite

An injury to the body that is caused by freezing, which most often affects the nose, ears, cheeks, chin, fingers, or toes.

Symptoms

  • Reduced blood flow to hands and feet
  • Numbness
  • Aching
  • Tingling or stinging
  • Bluish or pale, waxy skin

First Aid

  • Get into a warm room as soon as possible.
  • Unless necessary, do not walk on frostbitten feet or toes. Immerse the affected area in warm (not hot) water, or warm the affected area using body heat. Do not use a heating pad, fireplace, or radiator for warming.
  • Do not massage the frostbitten area; doing so may cause more damage.

 

Fire Investigators Asking For Public’s Assistance

 

The Fairfax County Fire and Rescue Department’s Fire and Hazardous Materials Investigative Services (FHMIS) section is currently investigating a fire at 5424 Ox Road involving a church sign. The incident occurred on September 13, 2017 at 10:54 a.m.

Investigators believe numerous people may have driven by the fire and may have information to assist us in solving this case. FHMIS is asking anyone who may have observed the fire to contact the Fire Marshal’s Office at 703-246-4874.

Please consider sharing via all personal social media platforms.

Free Heart Screening at Westfield High School This Saturday

Through the great work of the Ryan Lopynski Big Heart Foundation, there will be FREE on-site heart screenings this Saturday, September 23 from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m. at Westfield High School. They are provided for students ages 12-26. The results are reviewed on site by local cardiologists. Several of your Fairfax County Fire and Rescue Department members will be on hand as well.

To learn more about the event, please go here: Free Heart Screening at Westfield High School

To learn more about the foundation, please go here: Ryan Lopynski Big Heart Foundation

Did You Know: Sudden Cardiac Arrest is the leading cause of death in young athletes in the US. The best way to detect these heart conditions is through a heart screening using an EKG (Electrocardiogram). An EKG screening analyzes the electrical signals of the heart and is not typically provided at a youth’s annual physical.*

Free Heart Screening at Westfield High School This Saturday

Courtesy of the Ryan Lopynski Big Heart Foundation

 

*via the Ryan Lopynski Big Heart Foundation

A Practical Field Trip For High School Firefighters

On Monday, May 1, the High School Firefighter Program went on a field trip to Fire Station 40, Fairfax Center.

The main purpose of the field trip was to practice Hazardous Material (HazMat) decontamination procedures. What better place to practice than the fire station that houses the Fairfax County Fire and Rescue Department HazMat Team!

In addition, the class got a tour of the station as well as all of the equipment by members of C-Shift. For the last several weeks, the high school firefighters have been learning about all things HazMat that will eventually lead to a certification in Haz Mat.

High School Firefighter Program Students Adapt And Overcome

On Friday, March 3, the High School Firefighter Program students were provided practical training exercises on how to extinguish auto fires.

In one scenario, the students were presented with a little twist that required them to problem solve. The twist involved the fire engine access being blocked so they could not get closer to the auto on fire.

As you can see below, they did a good job finding a solution!

Know Two Ways Out

Did you know that fire can double in size approximately every 60 seconds? When fire strikes, deadly smoke can fill your home within minutes. That’s why Fairfax County Fire and Rescue wants you to plan and practice home fire drills. Watch this 30 second video, from our partners in safety at the United States Fire Administration, for life-saving tips on how to make a home fire escape plan.

Get more information, as well as a planning grid, here: Home Escape Planning

High School Firefighter Students Learn About Fire Behavior Firsthand

Today, the High School Firefighter students learned about fire behavior first hand by going into a live training fire.

The students were divided into two groups. One group donned their full protective gear and were required to have an instructor check to make sure the gear was correctly put on. Once that was done, the students were led inside the burn building where a safety briefing was conducted prior to the fire being lit. The second group stayed outside while another instructor explained to them what they should look for and why it is important. The groups then switched after the fire was put out.

Students inside the burn building saw how the fire can grow, how the heat builds, how the smoke can rise and bank down and travel in a building. 

 

The first portion of the training was captured live on our Facebook page. More photos below.

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