Fire Investigators Asking For Public’s Assistance

 

The Fairfax County Fire and Rescue Department’s Fire and Hazardous Materials Investigative Services (FHMIS) section is currently investigating a fire at 5424 Ox Road involving a church sign. The incident occurred on September 13, 2017 at 10:54 a.m.

Investigators believe numerous people may have driven by the fire and may have information to assist us in solving this case. FHMIS is asking anyone who may have observed the fire to contact the Fire Marshal’s Office at 703-246-4874.

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Tysons Elevator Rescue

On Wednesday, December 13 at approximately 6:37 p.m., units were dispatched for a person stuck in an elevator in the 1700 block of Tysons Boulevard in the Tysons Corner section of Fairfax County.

Units from Fire Station 29, Tysons Corner, arrived on scene, located the elevator and found it to be 35 feet below the 11th floor landing in a blind shaft. Contact was made with the occupant who reported no injuries. Power was controlled to the elevator and a Technical Rescue Operations Team (TROT) response was requested.

An elevator technician arrived and took control of surrounding elevator cars. A plan was devised to lower another elevator car down to the stalled car and remove the individual through the roof hatch. Several crew members went to the 12th floor and set up a lowering system for occupant removal. Two personnel went with the elevator technician to the stalled elevator car and made access to the individual through the roof hatch, secured him in a harness and safely moved him into the “rescue” elevator car.

The “rescue” car descended to the lobby where the occupant was assessed by EMS crews as a precaution.

 

 

 

Crew Reunites With Trauma Patient

By: Battalion Chief Bill Betz
Captain II Wayne Wentzel

On November 28, units from the 1st Battalion, B-Shift, had an opportunity to attend a Trauma Case Review at the Reston Hospital Center (RHC). The cases were presented by the RHC Medical Director of Trauma Services and were focused on three trauma patients that were treated and transported to RHC by our firefighter and paramedics that were in attendance.

This was an excellent opportunity for firefighters and paramedics to see how patient care is managed once the patient arrives at the emergency room through their outcome after the traumatic event. While RHC trauma doctors were reviewing the first case, a significant hand injury, they surprised everyone by having the patient speak to share his experience.

Crews had the unique opportunity to hear from the patient himself about the care he received from the fire and rescue personnel as well as RHC staff. It was rewarding to hear from the patient and how his road to recovery has been progressing.

The patient also had the opportunity to speak with the crew of Medic 404, Herndon, who treated and transported him to RHC. He was excited to meet the crew and was very thankful for all they had done for him in the short time he was in their care.

Fairfax County Fire and Rescue Department paramedic units transport many patients to local hospitals daily and rarely get an opportunity to see how their work impacts the long-term survival of these patients. This was yet another great example of how hard work and dedication of fire and rescue personnel, along with the great partnerships we have with our regional hospital partners, can positively impact those we serve.

Hand Injury

Firefighter Goza (l) and Captain Robb (r) with the patient showing how his hand has healed from the significant traumatic injury he suffered.

 

 

The Play (Training) Is Under Review: Paramedic Students Learn From Real-Life Scenarios And Video

By: Lieutenant Christopher Kroboth
EMS Training Section

Paramedic students closed out the Respiratory section of their Paramedic training with two weeks of real-time, real-life scenarios. One uniqueness to the Fairfax – Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) paramedic program is that the students act as patients while their fellow students “respond” to their emergency. This helps the students appreciate the patient perspective and brings life and new insight into the post-scenario discussion, also known as “the debrief”.

The students who are playing the “patient” have to moulage themselves – figure out how they (as the patient) will present, breathe, act and speak to the “responding” student based on their complaint/problem – as well as know how to respond to the treatment choices and actions of the “responding” crew. The diseases reviewed in the training scenarios ranged from severe asthma and congestive heart failure to pulmonary embolism and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD).

Using live role-players also greatly enhances the student’s learning by allowing students to practice patient assessments and history taking on live “patients.” The student “patients” wear IV pad trainers on their arms so their classmates will have to “start IV’s on them”, draw up and deliver simulated medications, and even hook them up to different airway devices. By requiring the student learners to actually do this in real time, every treatment and action they call for teaches them the power of timely decision-making, crew resource management, and gives them the complete picture of team performance with patient care.

The students who are not directly involved in the training scenario, are tasked with filming it from start to finish so that the “responding” lead student in the scenario can watch their performance later that day and critique themselves.

This is a model our EMS Training Section staff took from the professional sports industry of performance self-reflection. It has really helped the students appreciate how they operate under stress, and allows them to compare what they thought happened to what really did happen.

 

 

 

Five Dangers Of Deep Frying A Turkey

Over the last several years, deep frying a turkey has become a popular way to cook thanksgiving dinner. It has also become a very dangerous way to cook a thanksgiving meal!

Take a moment to watch the below Turkey Fryer Demonstration video from our partners in safety at Underwriters Laboratories (UL). As well, please review the Five Dangers Of Deep Frying A Turkey:

  1. Turkey fryers can easily tip over spilling hot oil across a large area.
  2. An overfilled cooking pot will cause oil to spill over when the turkey is placed inside.
  3. A partially frozen turkey will cause hot oil to splatter.
  4. Turkey fryers can easily overheat and start a fire.
  5. The pot, lid and handles of a turkey fryer can get dangerously hot and cause burn injuries.

 

Fairfax County Fire And Rescue Participating In TOYS FOR TOTS Campaign

Toys For Tots logoThe Fairfax County Fire and Rescue Department will be participating in the Annual National Capital Region Fire and EMS Departments’ 2017 TOYS FOR TOTS Campaign. The intent of the campaign is to “bring holiday joy and deliver a message of hope to children.” Stations will accept donations beginning on Monday, November 20.

Please help us to help those less fortunate this holiday season. Last year, thanks to the generosity of those who live and work in Fairfax County, the Fire and Rescue Department collected over 11,000 toys.

Children who are served by this campaign include toddlers and youths through age 17. The campaign will only accept new unwrapped toys and you can drop them off at any of our Fire and Rescue Stations. Toys used as weapons or considered to be weapons (i.e., toy guns or knives of any kind) will not be accepted. Checks or money orders for donations must be made payable to TOYS FOR TOTS.

Fairfax County Fire and Rescue Stations will accept donations through Monday, December 18. Toys will not be accepted after this date.