Herndon Apartment Fire Caused By Unattended Cooking

NEWS copy Flame

On Sunday, September 29, at approximately 12:47 p.m., units from Fairfax County Fire and Rescue and Loudoun County Fire and Rescue were dispatched for a reported apartment fire in the 900 block of Park Avenue in the Town of Herndon.

Units arrived on the scene of a three-story, garden style apartment to find smoke showing from the attic. Crews were able to work quickly to extinguish the fire and contain it to the apartment where the fire started. There were no firefighter injuries reported. One civilian was transported to an area hospital for a check-up.

Five occupants were home when the fire was discovered. Twenty-six occupants were in the apartment building at the time of the fire. There were no smoke alarms in the apartment. There were working smoke alarms in the adjacent apartments.

Fire Investigators determined that the fire was accidental in nature and started in the kitchen. The cause of the fire was grease that ignited in a pan on the cook stove after being left unattended.

Ten occupants from two apartments were displaced because of the fire. Red Cross assistance was offered and accepted. Damages were approximately $93,750.

Cooking related fires are one of the leading cause of fires locally and nationally. Fairfax County Fire and Rescue would like to remind all residents about cooking safely. Please remember to “Watch What You Heat!

Recipe for Safe Cooking

Apply Now For Community Fire And Rescue Academy

Want to learn more about the Fairfax County Fire and Rescue Department? Want to participate in an interesting, fun-filled, eight-week program that will show you what firefighters and paramedics do every day?

You can now apply to the Community Fire and Rescue Academy (CFRA)! The CFRA is open to persons 18 and older who live in Fairfax County. Each session will cover different aspects of the organization, providing an in-depth overview of the department and its uniformed and civilian workforce. Program topics include: fire suppression, emergency medical services, training, recruitment, special operations, and other interesting topics.

CFRA Application will be accepted until September 13, 2019. The Academy will begin September 26, 2019, and will meet for eight consecutive Thursdays, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. and ending on November 14, 2019.

To learn more about the program and to sign up, please go here: https://www.fairfaxcounty.gov/fire-ems/cfra

 

 

Fireworks Safety

Fireworks

The Fourth of July would not be the same without those breathtaking fireworks. However, tragedy can strike within seconds when fireworks are not properly and safely used. Thousands of people are injured each year in the United States due to fireworks. Consider the following safety tips when using permissible fireworks:

  • Keep all bystanders at least 25 feet away from fireworks.
  • During the use of permissible fireworks, minors should be supervised by a parent or legal guardian. Never allow young children to play with or ignite fireworks.
  • Adults should always supervise activities involving the use of permissible fireworks. Parents often do not realize there are more injuries from sparklers to children under five than from any other type of fireworks. Sparklers burn at temperatures of about 2,000 degrees, which is hot enough to melt some metals.
  • When using permissible fireworks, place the device on a flat surface, clear of any combustible material and clear of all buildings (50 feet).
  • When using permissible fireworks, place the device on a flat surface, clear of any combustible material and clear of all buildings (50 feet).
  • Make sure fireworks are legal in your area before buying or using them.
  • Never have any portion of your body directly over a fireworks device when lighting the fuse.
  • Never try to re-light or pick up fireworks that have not fully functioned.
  • Never point or throw fireworks at another person.
  • Keep a bucket of water or a garden hose handy in case of fire or other mishap.
  • Light one fireworks device at a time, then back to a safe distance immediately after lighting.
  • Never carry fireworks in a pocket or shoot them off in metal or glass containers.
  • Avoid buying or handling fireworks that come packaged in brown paper as this can often be a sign that the fireworks are commercial or display-type fireworks made for professional fireworks shows. These fireworks can pose a serious danger to consumers and the public.
  • Read the directions on fireworks packaging.
  • Store fireworks in a cool, dry place.

Don’t forget the safety of your pets during firework’s season!

  • Don’t bring your pets to a fireworks display, even a small one.
  • If fireworks are being used near your home, put your pet in a safe, interior room to avoid exposure to the sound.
  • Make sure your pet has an identification tag, in case it runs off during a fireworks display.
  • Never shoot fireworks of any kind (consumer fireworks, sparklers, fountains, etc.) near pets.

For an expanded list of fireworks safety tips, as well as information on fireworks safety-related publications, reports, videos, news, and recalls, visit the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) Fireworks Information Center online.

A list of legal and illegal fireworks for Virginia can be found at: http://www.dof.virginia.gov/fire/safety/fireworks.htm

FCFRD Crew in New Hip-Hop Video with Public Health Message

You heard of West Nile virus? // You might not realize it // but it’s inside of mosquitoes // and they can spread it to people

That’s the refrain of MC Bugg Z’s 2019 summer anthem, “West Nile Story.” Our crew from Fire Station 40, Fairfax Center, make cameos in his new hip-hop video to help drive home a very important public health message: West Nile virus is here in Fairfax County, it can make you sick, and we can all protect ourselves from mosquito bites by covering up and using insect repellent with EPA-recommended ingredients when we are outside.

MC Bugg-Z, also known as Andy Lima, is an insect biologist with the Fairfax County Health Department. This isn’t his first stab at public health hip-hop. He is also behind the performances Tick Check 1-2, Zika 101 and the Health Department’s Centennial Rap.

While “West Nile Story” is fun, , and downright catchy, it’s also full of important information local residents need to know about mosquito bites and the diseases they carry, how to prevent bites, and who is most at risk for severe cases of West Nile virus. Check it out below!

 

Oakton House Fire Displaces Two

On Saturday, June 1, at approximately 7:13 p.m., units were dispatched for a reported house fire in the 11200 block of Timberline Drive in the Oakton area of Fairfax County.

Units arrived on scene of a two-story, single home to find two vehicles on fire inside of an attached garage. The fire extended from the garage to the house. Crews rapidly deployed multiple fire hose lines to halt the spread of fire to all levels of the home. The fire was quickly brought under control. There were no civilian injuries. One firefighter was transported to an area hospital with a minor injury.

No occupants were home at the time of the fire. A passer-by saw flames coming from the garage and called 9-1-1. Smoke alarms were present and did sound.

Fire Investigators determined that the fire was accidental and started in the engine compartment of a vehicle parked inside the attached garage.

Two occupants have been displaced as a result of the fire. Red Cross assistance was offered and declined. Damages because of the fire were approximately $120,400.

Stay Safe Around Water This Weekend!

watersafety

Each Memorial Day weekend, swimming pools around the area open for the summer season. Also, families head toward the ocean shoreline, rivers and lakes to vacation and participate in a variety of water activities. With that in mind, your Fairfax County Firefighters and Paramedics ask that you take a moment to review the helpful water safety tips below from our friends at the American Red Cross.

Our firefighters and paramedics do not want to meet you, or your loved ones, by “a preventable accident” today, tomorrow or ever.

Make Water Safety Your Priority

  • Swim in designated areas supervised by lifeguards.
  • Always swim with a buddy; do not allow anyone to swim alone. Even at a public pool or a beach with life guard, use the buddy system!
  • Ensure that everyone in the family learns to swim well. Enroll in age-appropriate Red Cross water orientation and Learn-to-Swim courses.
  • Never leave a young child unattended near water and do not trust a child’s life to another child; teach children to always ask permission to go near water.
  • Have young children or inexperienced swimmers wear U.S. Coast Guard-approved life jackets around water, but do not rely on life jackets alone.
  • Establish rules for your family and enforce them without fail. For example, set limits based on each person’s ability, do not let anyone play around drains and suction fittings, and do not allow swimmers to hyperventilate before swimming under water or have breath-holding contests.
  • Even if you do not plan on swimming, be cautious around natural bodies of water including ocean shoreline, rivers and lakes. Cold temperatures, currents and underwater hazards can make a fall into these bodies of water dangerous.
  • If you go boating, wear a life jacket! Most boating fatalities occur from drowning.
  • Avoid alcohol use. Alcohol impairs judgment, balance and coordination; affects swimming and diving skills; and reduces the body’s ability to stay warm.

Prevent Unsupervised Access to the Water

  • Install and use barriers around your home pool or hot tub. Safety covers and pool alarms should be added as additional layers of protection.
  • Ensure that pool barriers enclose the entire pool area, are at least 4-feet high with gates that are self-closing, self-latching and open outward, and away from the pool. The latch should be high enough to be out of a small child’s reach.
  • If you have an above-ground or inflatable pool, remove access ladders and secure the safety cover whenever the pool is not in use.
  • Remove any structures that provide access to the pool, such as outdoor furniture, climbable trees, decorative walls and playground equipment.
  • Keep toys that are not in use away from the pool and out of sight. Toys can attract young children to the pool.

Maintain Constant Supervision

  • Actively supervise kids whenever around the water—even if lifeguards are present. Do not just drop your kids off at the public pool or leave them at the beach—designate a responsible adult to supervise.
  • Always stay within arm’s reach of young children and avoid distractions when supervising children around water.