Two Easy Steps To Saving A Life

As part of CPR and AED Awareness Week, Fairfax County Fire and Rescue would like to remind all residents that Hands-Only CPR can save lives. According to our friends at the American Heart Association, most people who experience cardiac arrest at home, work or in a public location die because they don’t receive immediate CPR from someone on the scene. 

As a bystander, don’t be afraid. Your actions can only help. Immediate CPR can double or even triple a person’s chance of survival. 

Watch the brief video below to learn how two easy steps can help to save a life in the event of an emergency.

 

Girls Fire and Rescue Academy Summer Camp Now Accepting Applications

Girls FRA Logo

The Fairfax County Fire and Rescue Department is excited to announce its Girls Fire and Rescue Academy summer camp, which will take place July 9 – 13, 2018. The Academy is open to female students who will be freshmen, sophomores, or juniors in the upcoming 2018-2019 school year. Participants must be a Fairfax County resident.

Academy participants will take part in a five day program full of fun-filled experiences, physical training, classes and Fire/EMS simulations. They will also have an opportunity to visit a Fairfax County Fire and Rescue Station to experience the everyday life of a Firefighter/EMT. Campers will have a chance to interact, ask questions and eat dinner with the on-duty crew.

The program is completely free of charge. The Academy will be limited to 24 applicants, so apply today! To apply, please click on the link below and follow the instructions.

All applications must be received by close of business on Friday, April 20, 2018.

For more information, and to register, please see below.

Girls Fire & Rescue Academy 2018 Application Packet

Girls Fire & Rescue Academy 2018 Flyer

Have Two Ways Out

It is the middle of the night and you are suddenly awakened by your smoke alarm. You notice some smoke in your bedroom. What do you do next?

The answer is easy: Get Out and Stay Out!

However, before that occurs it is important you develop, and practice, a home fire escape plan! The video below, from our partners in safety at the United States Fire Administration, will help guide you.

In addition, please go to our website and the Family Escape Plan which provides a grid and further guidance on developing a home escape plan.

 

Signs and Symptoms of Hypothermia and Frostbite

wind chill chartIt is COLD out there! If you need to be out and about in this weather, please dress appropriately and avoid prolonged exposure to the cold. Not dressing appropriately and staying outside too long in these cold temperatures could lead to serious cold related illness and injury such as Hypothermia or Frostbite.

Please take a moment to learn the Signs and Symptoms of Hypothermia and Frostbite from our friends at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Also learn what to do if you, or another person, are exhibiting signs or symptoms of either condition.

Hypothermia

A condition in which the body uses up its stored energy and can no longer produce heat. Often occurs after prolonged exposure to cold temperature.

Early symptoms

  • Shivering
  • Fatigue
  • Loss of coordination
  • Confusion and disorientation

Late symptoms

  • No shivering
  • Blue skin
  • Dilated pupils
  • Slowed pulse and breathing
  • Loss of consciousness

First Aid

  • Request immediate medical assistance.
  • Move the victim into a warm room or shelter.
  • Remove wet clothing.
  • Warm the center of their body first—chest, neck, head, and groin—using an electric blanket; or use skin-to-skin contact under loose, dry layers of blankets, clothing, or towels.
  • If conscious, warm beverages may help increase the body temperature. Do not give alcohol.
  • Once temperature has increased keep them dry and wrapped in a warm blanket, including the head and neck.
  • If no pulse, begin CPR.

Frostbite

An injury to the body that is caused by freezing, which most often affects the nose, ears, cheeks, chin, fingers, or toes.

Symptoms

  • Reduced blood flow to hands and feet
  • Numbness
  • Aching
  • Tingling or stinging
  • Bluish or pale, waxy skin

First Aid

  • Get into a warm room as soon as possible.
  • Unless necessary, do not walk on frostbitten feet or toes. Immerse the affected area in warm (not hot) water, or warm the affected area using body heat. Do not use a heating pad, fireplace, or radiator for warming.
  • Do not massage the frostbitten area; doing so may cause more damage.

 

Fire Investigators Asking For Public’s Assistance

 

The Fairfax County Fire and Rescue Department’s Fire and Hazardous Materials Investigative Services (FHMIS) section is currently investigating a fire at 5424 Ox Road involving a church sign. The incident occurred on September 13, 2017 at 10:54 a.m.

Investigators believe numerous people may have driven by the fire and may have information to assist us in solving this case. FHMIS is asking anyone who may have observed the fire to contact the Fire Marshal’s Office at 703-246-4874.

Please consider sharing via all personal social media platforms.

Home Holiday Fire Facts

It is that wonderful time of year when there are many holiday celebrations occurring. Please take a moment to review the below facts and video about home holiday fires from our partners in safety at the United States Fire Administration and the National Fire Protection Association. 

•One of every four home Christmas tree fires is caused by electrical problems.

•Although Christmas tree fires are not common, when they do occur, they are more likely to be serious. On average, one of every 32 reported home Christmas tree fires results in a death compared to an average of one death per 143 total reported home fires.

•A heat source too close to the tree causes one in every four Christmas tree fires.

•The top three days for home candle fires are Christmas, New Year’s Day, and Christmas Eve.

•Candles start two out of five home decoration structure fires.

Five Dangers Of Deep Frying A Turkey

Over the last several years, deep frying a turkey has become a popular way to cook thanksgiving dinner. It has also become a very dangerous way to cook a thanksgiving meal!

Take a moment to watch the below Turkey Fryer Demonstration video from our partners in safety at Underwriters Laboratories (UL). As well, please review the Five Dangers Of Deep Frying A Turkey:

  1. Turkey fryers can easily tip over spilling hot oil across a large area.
  2. An overfilled cooking pot will cause oil to spill over when the turkey is placed inside.
  3. A partially frozen turkey will cause hot oil to splatter.
  4. Turkey fryers can easily overheat and start a fire.
  5. The pot, lid and handles of a turkey fryer can get dangerously hot and cause burn injuries.