FREE Training Classes For Community Emergency Response Team

CERTThe Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) Program educates residents about disaster preparedness for hazards that may impact their area. CERT trains county residents in basic disaster response skills, such as fire safety, light search and rescue, team organization, and disaster medical operations. Using the training learned in the classroom and during exercises, CERT members can assist others in their neighborhood or workplace following an event when professional responders are not immediately available to help. CERT members also are encouraged to support emergency response agencies by taking a more active role in emergency preparedness projects in their community.

The CERT training classes below follows the FEMA curriculum, tailored to local disasters and hazards. Educates people about disaster preparedness for hazards that may impact their area and trains them in basic disaster response skills, such as fire safety, light search and rescue, team organization, and disaster medical operations. Emphasis on hands-on skill development and Fairfax County protocols and procedures. Instructor will provide syllabus with class schedule at first session. This training does not require any special physical strength or agility.

For more information and to register for the next class at the Fire and Rescue Academy, please click on the link below:
CERT 145 at the Fire and Rescue Academy, Monday and Wednesday – March 27, 29, April 1, 3, 8, 10, 22, 24

In addition, a class is being held on Fort Belvoir but is open to all. Arrangements can be made with a background check for access to Fort Belvoir for those who do not have routine access:
CERT 147 at Ft. Belvoir, Thursdays – March 28, April 4, 11, 18, 25, May 2, 9, 16

 

FREE Training Classes For Community Emergency Response Team

CERTThe Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) Program educates residents about disaster preparedness for hazards that may impact their area. CERT trains county residents in basic disaster response skills, such as fire safety, light search and rescue, team organization, and disaster medical operations. Using the training learned in the classroom and during exercises, CERT members can assist others in their neighborhood or workplace following an event when professional responders are not immediately available to help. CERT members also are encouraged to support emergency response agencies by taking a more active role in emergency preparedness projects in their community.

The CERT training classes below follows the FEMA curriculum, tailored to local disasters and hazards. Educates people about disaster preparedness for hazards that may impact their area and trains them in basic disaster response skills, such as fire safety, light search and rescue, team organization, and disaster medical operations. Emphasis on hands-on skill development and Fairfax County protocols and procedures. Instructor will provide syllabus with class schedule at first session. This training does not require any special physical strength or agility.

For more information and to register for the next class at the Fire and Rescue Academy, please click on the link below:

CERT 144 at the Fire and Rescue Academy, Monday and Wednesday – Feb 25, 27, March 4, 6,11,13,18, 20

Firehouse Foods: Eggnog French Toast

By: Kendall Warner, Intern
Office of Public Affairs

On the latest edition of Firehouse Foods, newly promoted Battalion Chief Jenn Svites shows us how to make her Eggnog French Toast.

Battalion Chief Svites has been cooking since she was an eight-year-old. She received her first Betty Crocker Cookbook when she was 11. Since then she has perfected many family recipes, cooked for many shifts at different fire stations, and created her own spin on classic recipes like her Eggnog French Toast.

Recipe

All ingredients are based on taste preference, Chief Svites does not use exact measurements and encourages you to make the recipe your own!

Toast
Bread of your choosing (Chief Svites uses Brioche because it’s dense and absorbs the eggnog wash well)
Eggnog of your choosing (If you are lactose intolerant, try eggnog made with milk alternatives)
Nutmeg to preference
Cinnamon to preference
Eggs (Chief Svites uses 3 large eggs for half a gallon of eggnog)

Topping
Drizzle with caramel sauce
Powdered sugar
Strawberries

Try different toppings, sauces, fruits, and anything to make it your own!

Carbon Monoxide: Colorless And Odorless Killer

CO alarm

Photo courtesy of NFPA

Carbon Monoxide (CO) is a colorless, odorless and tasteless gas. It causes more than 150 accidental fatalities each year; thousands more are treated in hospitals for CO poisoning. CO combines with hemoglobin in our blood and robs the blood of the oxygen our body needs. Early symptoms of exposure are similar to the flu and include headache, fatigue, nausea, and confused thinking (so victims cannot think clearly enough to get assistance). Without treatment, the victim will lose consciousness, and if no help is given will lose their life.

CO is produced by combustion. Common causes are:

  • Defective gas or oil furnaces and water heaters
  • Cracked chimney flues
  • Indoor use of charcoal grills
  • Use of a gas oven or range to warm a room
  • Running a car in an enclosed area
  • Closing the fireplace damper before the fire is completely out

CO accidents are preventable. Actions you should take to protect your family are:

  • Each year you should have a qualified technician inspect your gas furnace and appliances.
  • Never allow your car to run in an enclosed area, especially if it is a garage attached to your house.
  • Make sure your fireplace is in good repair and do not close the damper before the fire is out.
  • Install CO alarms to give your family a warning if CO is building up in your house.

CO alarms should be located on every floor and mounted according to the manufacturer’s instructions. If the alarm goes off, everyone should get out of the house at once and call the fire department by dialing 911 from a neighbor’s house. Do not ventilate your house by opening doors and windows. When the fire department personnel arrive they will obtain CO readings in different areas of your home to determine the source of the CO.

Another very important point to remember is that you still need a working smoke alarm on every level of your home. The CO alarm does not sense smoke or fire. Smoke alarms are needed to give your family early warning if there is a fire in your home.