Fireworks Safety

Fireworks

The Fourth of July would not be the same without those breathtaking fireworks. However, tragedy can strike within seconds when fireworks are not properly and safely used. Thousands of people are injured each year in the United States due to fireworks. Consider the following safety tips when using permissible fireworks:

  • Keep all bystanders at least 25 feet away from fireworks.
  • During the use of permissible fireworks, minors should be supervised by a parent or legal guardian. Never allow young children to play with or ignite fireworks.
  • Adults should always supervise activities involving the use of permissible fireworks. Parents often do not realize there are more injuries from sparklers to children under five than from any other type of fireworks. Sparklers burn at temperatures of about 2,000 degrees, which is hot enough to melt some metals.
  • When using permissible fireworks, place the device on a flat surface, clear of any combustible material and clear of all buildings (50 feet).
  • When using permissible fireworks, place the device on a flat surface, clear of any combustible material and clear of all buildings (50 feet).
  • Make sure fireworks are legal in your area before buying or using them.
  • Never have any portion of your body directly over a fireworks device when lighting the fuse.
  • Never try to re-light or pick up fireworks that have not fully functioned.
  • Never point or throw fireworks at another person.
  • Keep a bucket of water or a garden hose handy in case of fire or other mishap.
  • Light one fireworks device at a time, then back to a safe distance immediately after lighting.
  • Never carry fireworks in a pocket or shoot them off in metal or glass containers.
  • Avoid buying or handling fireworks that come packaged in brown paper as this can often be a sign that the fireworks are commercial or display-type fireworks made for professional fireworks shows. These fireworks can pose a serious danger to consumers and the public.
  • Read the directions on fireworks packaging.
  • Store fireworks in a cool, dry place.

Don’t forget the safety of your pets during firework’s season!

  • Don’t bring your pets to a fireworks display, even a small one.
  • If fireworks are being used near your home, put your pet in a safe, interior room to avoid exposure to the sound.
  • Make sure your pet has an identification tag, in case it runs off during a fireworks display.
  • Never shoot fireworks of any kind (consumer fireworks, sparklers, fountains, etc.) near pets.

For an expanded list of fireworks safety tips, as well as information on fireworks safety-related publications, reports, videos, news, and recalls, visit the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) Fireworks Information Center online.

A list of legal and illegal fireworks for Virginia can be found at: http://www.dof.virginia.gov/fire/safety/fireworks.htm

Relish This Memorial Day Weekend And Please Grill Safely!

Going to do a little cooking on the grill this Memorial Day Weekend? Fairfax County Fire and Rescue would like to remind all residents about grilling safely. Here are some safety tips for a happy and safe cookout experience:Relish Today, Ketchup Tomorrow! Please Grill Safely!

  • Never leave your grill unattended or place combustibles too close to grill. These are the two leading causes for charcoal grill home fires.
  • Use charcoal lighter fluid only before the fire is lit. If you try to make a fire bigger by adding more fluid, the heat from the coals may ignite the stream of fuel and burn back into the can, causing it to explode in your hands.
  • Never use gasoline to start a fire – it is much too dangerous to use on grills.
  • Try using a U.L. approved electrical starter in place of lighter fluid.
  • Never use a grill on apartment or condominium balconies. This practice is one of the biggest dangers with grills. It is unsafe and against the law.
  • Place grills away from structures so they will not tip over or ignite objects above them.
  • Keep a garden hose or a portable fire extinguisher handy in case the fire gets out of control.
  • Never bring a grill into the home. The carbon monoxide produced by burning charcoal can be dangerous, even deadly, in an enclosed space.
  • Keep children and pets away from fires and grills. Declare a three foot “safe zone” around the grill. It only takes a second for curiosity to cause a serious burn.
  • Though coals may appear to be cool, always soak them with water. Coals retain enough heat to reignite for days after the fire.
  • Periodically remove grease or fat buildup in trays below the grill so it cannot be ignited by a hot grill.
  • If your bag of charcoal gets wet, leave it in a well ventilated area away from the house. During the drying process spontaneous ignition can occur in confined areas.

 

National Stop The Bleed Day Today!

By: Captain Bruce Stark
Communications Section

Today, May 23, is the second annual National Stop the Bleed Day. Why is it important to learn how to Stop the Bleed? It is important as a person can die from severe uncontrolled bleeding in as little as five minutes.

When a traumatic bleeding emergency occurs in Fairfax County most often a friend, family member, neighbor, co-worker or bystander is on scene immediately after the traumatic bleeding injury has occurred. You have the power to learn some simple steps and effective bleeding control techniques that could preserve someone’s life until your Fairfax County firefighters/paramedics arrive. Below are steps you can take to help “stop the bleed.”

First call 9-1-1 to get Fairfax County Fire and Rescue units on the way. The sooner you call 911, the faster professional help will arrive.

Remember, your safety is the number one priority! You cannot help someone if you get injured. Be sure the area is safe before you decide to help.

Next expose the area that is bleeding and with a cloth or bandage use both hands to apply firm, steady pressure to the area that is bleeding. If you don’t have a bandage or cloth immediately available, apply firm and steady pressure with your hands. This will still help to slow or stop the bleeding.

If bleeding has not stopped, and there is one available, apply a commercially made tourniquet at least 2-3 inches above the injured area and tighten until bleeding has stopped. If bleeding has not stopped then place a second tourniquet above and next to the first tourniquet. Remember a tourniquet will not work if placed on top of a knee or elbow so be sure to avoid these areas.

If a commercially made tourniquet is not available, be very cautious in attempting to make an improvised tourniquet. Thin items such as phone chargers, extension cords, shoelaces, and rope are to narrow to be used as a tourniquet. In addition to not working, those items can cause severe damage to the nerves of the injured limb.

Below is an info-graphic from our friends at the Department of Homeland Security. A downloadable and accessible version is available by clicking here https://www.dhs.gov/stopthebleed

Stop The Bleed #StopTheBleed

Overloaded Circuit Causes Springfield House Fire

On Thursday, May 16, at approximately 8:57 a.m., units from Fairfax County Fire and Rescue and the City of Alexandria Fire Department were dispatched for a reported house fire in the 5500 block of Sheldon Drive in the Springfield area of Fairfax County.

Units arrived on scene of a two-story, single family home with fire showing from an attached garage. The fire extended into the living area of the home. Crews worked quickly to extinguish the fire. There were no reported civilian or firefighter injuries.

One occupant was home at the time of the fire. The occupant discovered the fire and self-evacuated prior to fire department arrival. There were smoke alarms in the home, however, they did not work as they did not have batteries.

Fire Investigators determined that the fire was accidental in nature and started in a bedroom adjacent to the garage. The cause of the fire was an overloaded circuit which caused high resistant heating in the electrical wiring.

Four occupants were displaced because of the fire. Red Cross assistance was offered and accepted. Damages as a result of the fire were approximately $73,750.

5500 block Sheldon Drive

Firehouse Foods: Big Mac Casserole

On this episode of Firehouse Foods Technician Adrian Cubbage, Station 19, Lorton, B-Shift cooks up his Big Mac Casserole recipe.

Recipe and instructions are below video.

 

Mac sauce:

1⁄4 cup Miracle Whip
1⁄4 cup mayonnaise
2 tablespoons French dressing
1⁄2 tablespoon sweet relish
2 teaspoons dill pickle relish
1 teaspoon sugar
1 teaspoon onion, minced
1 teaspoon white vinegar
1 teaspoon ketchup
Salt to taste
Mix vigorously. Do not heat.

Casserole:

64 oz. Straight Cut French Fries
1 lb. of 85/15 Ground Beef per 2 people
1 head of lettuce
24 slices of American cheese (48 if you’re up for it!)
1 white onion
1 Jar Dill Pickle hamburger slices
24 Sesame seed hamburger buns

– Bake French Fries according to package
– Dice full onion (reserve some for cooking with beef, some for topping casserole)
– Chop head of lettuce into shreds
– Cook entirety of ground beef until medium rare (will finish to well done when baking). Drain beef.

– Start your layering process (in order as written):

First layer – Bottom buns; ground beef; cheese (optional); half of shredded lettuce

Second layer – Baked French Fries; rest of ground beef; rest of cheese; rest of lettuce; pickles to preference; onions to preference; entirety of Mac Sauce; Top Buns (buttering by brushing makes top buns crispy and delicious)

-Once layered, bake at 350 degrees F for 30 minutes. Let rest for 5 minutes and serve.